GKA Blog

Stem Cell Transplants – transforming the cancer battleground

Posted by Emma Garside on 15/07/15 15:30

Cancer remains the second largest cause of death in the UK. While diagnosis and treatments continue to improve thanks to the work done by world-leading researchers and specialist experts, there is still much to learn, and a very long way to go, before we can completely defeat this dreadful disease.

One scientific area that may yet prove to be highly influential in discovering a cure for cancer is cancer stem cell research. One place dedicated to pioneering, world-leading research and improving our understanding of the role cancer stem cells play is the European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute.

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Growth Hormone Deficiency and healthcare market research

Posted by Emma Garside on 29/06/15 11:00

Facts about Growth Hormone Deficiency

  • Growth hormones deficiency affects 1 in 3,800 children
  • Although the importance of the pituitary gland for growth was recognised in the late 19th century, growth hormone therapy was only made available in the late 1950s
  • Growth hormone is also known as somatotropin
  • Growth hormone was first isolated from the human pituitary gland in 1956 and the first patient was given human growth hormone in 1958 in Boston, USA
  • Since October 1985, biosynthetic growth hormone has replaced the pituitary-derived hormone in the UK
  • Early diagnosis and treatment means most children with growth hormone deficiency will catch up with other children’s growth and achieve a normal growth rate

Growth_Hormone

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How Caregivers can add insight to your Healthcare Market Research

Posted by Adam Irwin on 23/06/15 14:00

When we think of healthcare market research, we tend to think of patients and doctors. We may even think of pharmacists and commissioners if we’re taking a broader view. But one group – a silent army of invaluable helpers – is often entirely forgotten, and that is caregivers. 

They go by a few different names: unpaid caregivers, non-professional caregivers, informal caregivers. These are the family members and friends who take on the task of providing regular assistance to someone who has limited ability to take care of themselves.

Most often these caregivers can be adult children caring for their aged parents, one spouse taking care of the other, or one family member caring for another. In some cases, it may even be a close friend or lifelong neighbour offering essential assistance.

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What's the history behind Cystic Fibrosis?

Posted by Emma Garside on 05/03/15 15:56

Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a disease with an unusual history. In the past, the condition was often diagnosed by mothers who noticed their baby’s skin tasted salty when kissed, a symptom scientists used to develop the first diagnostic test in the later 20th century.

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Learn more about HIV in healthcare market research...

Posted by Emma Garside on 18/02/15 15:53

In 1981, when doctors started to notice that an increasing number of gay men were succumbing to opportunistic infections, alarm bells began to ring, yet few could have guessed the terrible impact and global reach of the human immunodeficiency virus.

Since then, an estimated 39 million people have died from AIDS-related illnesses, including 1.5 million people in 2013. 

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Explore ADHD in healthcare market research...

Posted by Emma Garside on 03/02/15 10:39

Although often thought of as a modern condition, the key symptoms of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) were first described over 2,000 years ago.

 

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How does it feel to live with Parkinson’s disease?

Posted by Huw Davies on 05/12/14 14:29

At GKA our strength in recruiting and conducting patient studies in Parkinson’s disease (PD) allows us to get a true understanding of what people living with PD face every day.

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurological condition which can be symptomatically treated, but not cured. Treatments aim to reduce symptoms and maintain quality of life by replacing or preserving dopamine in the brain.

Dopamine is involved in the coordination and control of movement, and as the levels progressively fall as PD worsens, the symptoms of Parkinson’s start to appear.



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Would you like to hear what rheumatologists really think?

Posted by Adam Irwin on 14/11/14 15:44

At GKA, we are experts in recruitment for healthcare qualitative market research studies. With a panel of over 400 rheumatologists and nearly 200 specialist nurses, we know we’ll get the opinions that really matter for our RA projects.

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Why was haemophilia called the ‘Royal disease’?

Posted by Emma Garside on 14/11/14 10:12

10 of Queen Victoria’s descendants, including her son Prince Leopold and three of her grandchildren, suffered from, and died, of haemophilia.


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Who was the first person diagnosed with MS?

Posted by Emma Garside on 24/10/14 16:20

In the 19th century, George the III’s grandson was thought to have multiple sclerosis (MS)

The field of MS has come a long way since then. In fact, with the addition of new cutting-edge therapies over the last few years, it is one of the most fast-moving, and exciting fields to be working in. At GKA we’ve certainly seen a vast change over the 25 years we have been conducting medical fieldwork in multiple sclerosis.

Multiple Sclerosis_Medical Fieldwork

 

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