GKA Blog

The essential fieldwork checklist: how to make sure your medical market research is a success

Posted by GKA on 16/05/19 22:03

Healthcare market research recruitment can be a bit of a challenge. With strict criteria, low-incidence rate diseases and hard-to-reach patients to think about, it’s no wonder healthcare market research recruitment can be a challenge for even the most experienced researcher. And that’s before you add time-pushed healthcare professionals into the mix, too!

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Topics: healthcare market research

From GPwSIs to GPwERs: what’s the difference between the two?

Posted by GKA on 03/05/19 14:44

In 2000, the NHS proposed a new role: the GP with a Special Interest (GPwSI). The plan was for this new type of GP to work as part of locally integrated services by providing intermediate care and relieving the pressure on consultants. GPwSIs came into effect in 2006, however, in 2015 the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) agreed on the term GP with an Extended Role (GPwER) instead. This new definition includes all those previously referred to as GPwSIs, with the main difference between the two being that individual GPs themselves are now accredited, as opposed to the service and the premises where the GPs work. But what do GPwERs do, why are they needed, and how can they help with healthcare market research recruitment?

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Topics: healthcare market research

Who’s who in COPD? A medical fieldwork guide

Posted by GKA on 15/04/19 14:56

The lowdown

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the name for a group of lung conditions that cause breathing difficulties. It occurs when the lungs become inflamed, damaged, or narrowed, and one of the main causes is smoking - although the condition can affect those who have never smoked.

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Topics: healthcare market research

Mind the gap: gender pay gap in the NHS

Posted by GKA on 11/04/19 16:20

The issue of gender pay gaps is nothing new. In fact, national gender pay gap data has been collected for years - and the UK has actually made significant progress over the last 50 years, moving from a median gap of 47.6% in 1970 to 16.8% in 2016. Last year, along with over 10,000 other organisations across the country, as part of a requirement of the 2017 amendment to the 2010 Equality Act, English NHS organisations employing more than 250 people published headline details of their gender pay gap.

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Topics: healthcare market research

How to manage market research out of hours

Posted by GKA on 20/03/19 15:06

When conducting healthcare market research, it’s not uncommon to need to carry out research out of hours, especially when engaging with healthcare professionals with antisocial working hours or even just fitting in around patients’ busy lives. Whether you’re conducting an in-depth interview or a market research online community, a focus group or an ethnographic study, all out of hours market research requires careful organisation to ensure that your study goes off without a hitch. From scheduling to software testing, here are a few of our tried and tested tips to make sure your healthcare research runs as smoothly as possible.

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Topics: healthcare market research

What is the Care Quality Commission?

Posted by GKA on 12/03/19 16:11

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is the independent regulator of health and social care in England. They work with hospitals, GP surgeries, dental practices, care homes and other health services to ensure they provide safe, effective, compassionate and high-quality patient care - whilst at the same time encouraging care services to improve. As well as registering care providers, the CQC also monitors, inspects and rates services, takes action to protect people who use care services and publishes its view on quality issues in health and social care.

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Topics: healthcare market research

Recruiting hard-to-reach respondents: six steps to success

Posted by GKA on 28/02/19 14:55

 The quality of your participants is paramount to the success of your study. Good participants can be the difference between insightful, in-depth results that fulfil your objectives and fieldwork that just falls a bit flat. Let’s face it - it’s tricky to find terrific respondents these days, even when you’re working with the most generic of target audiences. But add low incidence rate diseases and HCPs who specialise in rare therapy areas into the mix and you’ve got even more work to do. Don’t worry though - it can be done! Here’s our six-step guide on how to recruit hard-to-reach participants so your medical fieldwork recruitment goes smoothly, no matter how strict your criteria.

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Topics: healthcare market research

From the patient’s perspective… Haemophilia

Posted by GKA on 12/02/19 09:52

There are an estimated 400,000 people worldwide living with haemophilia, with approximately 6,000 sufferers in the UK alone. Haemophilia is an inherited disorder that affects the body’s ability to clot. Usually, when someone cuts themselves, clotting factors and platelets combine to make the blood stickier and stop the bleeding. However, in haemophiliacs, the bleeding episodes last longer due to abnormal clotting, and bruising and spontaneous bleeding can also occur too. The main problem for haemophiliacs is internal bleeding into joints, muscles and soft tissues, which can cause pain and stiffness and ultimately lead to joint damage. To better our understanding of the patient's perspective when it comes to market research studies, we spoke to someone who recently took part in haemophilia research with GKA.

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Topics: healthcare market research

Biosimilars: what are they and what do they mean for the NHS?

Posted by GKA on 31/01/19 12:11

 What are biosimilars?

A biological medicine is a type of treatment for long-term medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and psoriasis that’s given via a drip or an injection pen. A biosimilar medicine is simply a newer version of the original biological drug: as the name suggests, it’s highly similar to EMA-approved biological medicines in terms of safety, purity and potency, and it works in much the same way. There are no clinically meaningful differences, just minor differences in clinically inactive components being allowed, and they have to go through the same rigorous scientific assessments before becoming available on the market.

So how are they different to biological drugs? Well, instead of being created using chemical synthesis, biosimilars are synthesised from living organisms or their products, such as hormones, proteins yeast or bacteria. As a result, the molecules within the drug could vary slightly between different batches, which means research and development takes an average of about 10 years. In addition, biosimilars can only become available once a branded drug patent expires - and according to Pfizer, approximately 100 biologic products will lose patent or other protections by 2022, which means newer and cheaper biosimilar products will soon become available.

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Topics: healthcare market research

Who’s who in Alzheimer's? A medical fieldwork guide

Posted by GKA on 07/12/18 11:45

Alzheimer’s is a physical disease that affects the brain and is the most common type of dementia in the UK. Over time, the disease causes proteins to build up in the brain and form structures called ‘plaques’ and ‘tangles’. These proteins lead to the loss of connections between nerve cells, eventually resulting in the death of the cells and loss of brain tissue. Additionally, Alzheimer's sufferers also have a shortage of vital chemicals which help to transmit signals around the brain, meaning that the signals aren’t transmitted effectively.

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Topics: healthcare market research

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